December 28 1877

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 Sender: Mollie Burns
Sender Location: Georgetown, KY
Recipient: John J Haun
Recipient Location: Quincy, CA

Friday Morning December 28th 1877

My Dear Husband,
Your letter arrived on christmas

day found us, all well. I had begun to think I should never
hear from you again, my letter must have laid ni Quincy
a very long time suppose Dave was up on the hill the
money arived safe on yesterday for which rec our thanks. the
children send theirs to Granma for her present just in order
I shall tell you of our childrens christmas in Ky. GranPa
got us a cedar out at the sentary they are more scarce here than in Cal–and we had a
family chirstmas tree for our children as there are considerable
of them here we fixed it up after they had all
gone to bed lit them in about 10 oclock christmas
morning the tree was very pretty and full. Morgie got
a gun that he could shoot, do no damage from Unckle
Stafford & knife from Tom chalk, three packs of crackers
from Tommie Jenkins, Cousin Aurther C– is here spending
the holidays with his sister Emma across the street
the one that took the children over St Louis when
thare he put them on some presents 16f You rember
I wrote you that on Matties birthday Fannie gave her
a dimier, an Morgies she was very bussy could not
fix him one and he did not like it told her
so, {Granma remarked Morgie I made you a
cake} he, said and such a cake. it was a
Singercoke and he never did love
them so his Aunt F had a big white cake all
nicely iced and on the tree for him and I
wish you could have seen his eyes when the name
was read, and the big cake handed him
on a waiter eh said all this for me, and soon
had his nife in it now for Matties
She got a very large tea set, tea pot hold a pint all
the rest acording from Boots Unckle S– put her
on a beautiful pair of Silver colored vaces. Tom
chalk, a beautful little hold ring, all carved
next comes Toots, way up on top of the tree was
a large doll hansomely dressed for Miss Annie
Deaner Haun as she calls herself, from Unckle S–
her bill was filled I set her in her little chair
up on the table with her doll and wished Papa
could only see her. Tom C– put her on a box
of ABC blocks and Lee Jenkins a large piture
Book. Granpa got candies oranges poof corn
balls things for them to eat next day went
to Fannie to dinner so we spent our christmas although
it was raining, we have had a very mild winter
so far could almost do with out fire only one
cold snap, have got no ice yet. We have been
in the midst of the Murphy movement attending
their meetings Morgie & Matie would not lit me rest
untill I had gone like she rest and got on
the blue ribbon they have got all the old
drunks about town almost closed up all the
saloons, court day christmas thare was scarcely
any drinking I told Morgie he was going to a wine country
and he must understand that he could drink none, but
he must do like all the rest so I went with him the
first temperance pledge I even singed but they have
such fine speaker all ove the country Aunt Lizzie
Unckle Moore, and Lizzie ward was in to spend
the day with us, Callie Vanghn & her Unckle
Ware were here, and Lizzie I could have no
private chat, but I promised Lizzie I would
go out shortly she is at her Aunts for the winter
all the children are at school. she told me she only
seen Jrow twice, and told him not to come to
see her again I thought I would aske her
no questions let her tell me only as she filt
disposed, she did not say who she was with
in san francisco, but did not seemed to have
seen any of those that were old residents of Quincy
said she was two months in Virginia gone 5
in all, shall see her again shortly. Unckle Moore said
Mr Ware was an old Beau of Aunt Lizzies run
her considerably. I am almost tempted to tell
you not to let Bob know one word of what
is in my letters, ma sais till him to write. Boots
says if he keeps his sences he will never waste
another stamp on him, Charlie has made a nice
young man. I have no patience with Bob not
writing to Ma. he never thinks o the many hours she
has toiled for him, the hours of sleep, she has lost
for him. she had not money to relieve her of many
cares the rich never know. You wish to know when I will come
to far as the snows are concerned now, it is so late, that
I guess it will be as safe starting one time as another
in the winter. I shall write to the old Ladie at Milers
berg and see if she is still waiting what she will
do. I would like you to make inquiries at the Hotells
thare, see if any one has come over the road and
if there is much snow on the sheds, suppose
they do not always plubish the conditions of the
roads I would like to hear the report of one
that has ben over lately Pa & Ma seeme so un-
willing to have me start in winter Ma says she
feels this is her last time on earth with me
Fannie wont hear to it But we all want to
see Papa so bad that we wont stay much
longer. You talk of Oregon & Texas. I dont want
to make many more moves, my hope when I left
Ky first was to secure us a little home fix it
as we were able, to our notion, whare if we had not
much wealth, our children self, would feel indepen
dant great wealth is not my only ideah of
a happy home, want to see you able to take it a
little comfortable, I shall never forget the many
times you came in with not a dry thread, out
of the slushy snow am glad you are out of it,
hope your habor will not be so miss applied as
in Quincy, shoveling snow wadeing through ice
water to feed stock, for which you could sell
at scarcely no price atall in comeing home would
I have to go to San francisco or not, and
you would have to let me know at what
house to stop at in Santa Rosa and who to
apply to to let you know we were thare
if you are 8 miles out. You have never said
what road you were liveing on. who do you
all know in the place. You were a long
time on the road. speak of geese, guess Morgie
can have a feather bed now he likes them so.
sleeps on one here, has one all to himself I
take the two little Girls with me, they want
to know if the neighbors have any little
boys & Girl;s to play with have lots here, Morgie
insists that Joe Jenkins must go home with
him talks awfull big about that boat
that is to be made, his gun and the
Ducks he expects his Unckle Bob & him
will kill. Hinches shop was equal to a
Circus to them this christmas, Dave Adams
tells Morgie that his Papa has found a-
nother Wife children dont want to see
his any more. Unckle Hafford that
you are going to superceed Benjamin Young
but he insists on his Papa’s integrity. You
did not say how you got my ornaments down
fear they were injured for I know it was
a partickular job. you spoke of you ma’s
writing would like to hear from her as
women think of many things men never
never do. Morgie says save him some cider
dont drink it all up before he comes
my letters from you have ben so far apart I
hope as you are settled for a little while at least
they will be more numerous the rest of
my stay here. Unckle john west is clerking for
Bill Pullen, his head is white he looks old Louis
West is here, never sold his house. Mrs Joe
Barklie lives in it. I will send you the
times wich containes a litter from George
descriptive of his lty he has marrie thare
Joe & Miller have another babie, none of that
family have called on me. Unckle More says
he does not consider that one of his Girls have
married well Aunt M says that Sallie escaped
lots of trouble. But as I wish to write
to MRs Whaley I shall close write as
soon as you get this, your last was quite
a long letter just the kind I like to gett
and the ones I am dis like to write but
if they were oftner I could stand shorter
ones. I ask Took whare her home is tell her
she has none she says she lives whare Beattie
stays, one night when I was giving them
a bath she seemed to remember seeing
Papa take his, before the fire. of seeing
you undressed all join in Love to you
all. When I return home will have Brother
stafford or Tom Jenkins to go to Cinn
with me see me on the train to St Louis, will
not make any stops travle day & night untill
I get home I rented the sleepers only
two nights when coming but think it best

[sideways]
to go day & night and the time out is shorter Lizzzie thinks

[sideways]
I will have to pay for Morgie I shall try to save his
fare if I can I will not buy a ticket and then
if they require money can pay it
Love to all kisses for Papa

affec your loveing wife
Mollie
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