People

A list of people mentioned in the Haun collection, including dates of birth and death and biographical details, where know. Family members are arranged by relationship relative to the primary diarist, James and John Haun, and by year of birth. All others are arranged alphabetically by surname. Biographical details have been included where known.

To submit additional information for inclusion please write to hauncollection@gmail.com.

Family

Plumas County Residents

Marysville Residents

Kentucky Residents

Family

Immediate Family

James Humphrey Haun
b. June 24 1811
m. September 1 1831
d. June 20 1890
James Haun was born near Haun’s Mill near Lexington in Scott County, Kentucky to John Haun and Katherine Winter. He had four younger brothers, and at least one sister. The family business was milling.

In 1831, James married Martha Hurst of Georgetown, and the couple had one son, John, born in 1834. They were active in the local Baptist church, and had many friends. Financially, the family was moderately successful, with a home and business. They were also slave owners, with four adult slaves, Betty, or ‘Bett’, Sam, Kitt, and Wash, and their children. However, they dreamed of having a farm of their own.

In 1853, James set out for the gold mines of California in company with his seventeen-year-old son John and his young brother Dave, with the goal of earning enough to purchase property at home. He prospected on Willow Creek near Nelson Point on the Middle Fork of the Feather River as a member of several different mining companies. Although he never struck it rich, his claims paid well. In November 1855 he was joined by his wife and her young niece Lizzie, and in 1856 purchased the 160 acre American Ranch in Quincy, which the family operated as a farm and hotel until its sale in 1876. He was an active member of the Plumas Rangers and local Democratic organizations. He passed away at the age of 78 at home in Quincy.

top

Martha ‘Patsy’ Hurst Haun
b. August 28 1811
m. September 1 1831
Martha, known to her family as Patsy, was born in Georgetown in 1811 and married James Haun in 1831 at the age of 20. Initially she remained behind when her husband and son departed to seek their fortune in California in 1853, in order to collect remaining debts from their business, which had recently been wound up, and to look after the family’s slaves.

After two years, when it became evident that settling in California was the family’s best option, Martha and her niece Lizzie, who resided with her, traveled to California, escorted by her brother-in-law Dave Haun. The party was snowed up in Rabbit Creek in December of 1855, and Martha traveled the rest of the way to Nelson Creek on a hand sled. In 1856, Martha moved with her husband to the newly acquired American Ranch in Quincy.

James and Martha
James and Martha Haun

top

John James Haun
b. December 11 1834
m. November 14 1867
d. November 27 1918
John Haun was born in Georgetown, Kentucky and traveled with his father to California in 1853 in search of gold. As a child, he learned to play the fiddle, and he frequently entertained the miners in camp with his playing. John prospected and and worked the family ranch until 1861, when he returned briefly to his childhood home in Georgetown before enlisting in the Confederate army at the outbreak of the Civil War.

John joined the 5th Kentucky Cavalry, 2nd Brigade under General Cantrell in Beach Grove, Tennessee and became one of Morgan’s famous raiders. He was shot through his vest and hat but was never wounded. He was captured in Ohio in 1863 and held as a prisoner of war at Camp Chase for 18 months. It was during his incarceration that he began wooing his future wife Mollie Burns via letter.

Following his release, John returned to Georgetown, where he married Mollie November 14 1857, and the couple departed for California, settling in Quincy. They had six children, thee sons and two daughters, and a fourth son who died in infancy.

top

Mary ‘Mollie’ Chalk Burns Haun
b. February 3 1842
m. November 14 1867
d. Mary 12 1924
Mollie was born in Georgetown, Kentucky and educated at a private girl’s school. After a long courtship, she married John Haun and traveled with him to California abroad the ship Constitution, setting in Quincy, where the couple raised their five children. She returned to Georgetown for a visit of several months some 10 years after her marriage. She was a popular figure in both Georgetown and Quincy, active in church and ladies organizations, and was reputedly charming and beautiful. She died at the age of 82, at home in Quincy.

John and Mollie
John and Mollie Haun

top

Extended Family

Henry Peter ‘H.P.’ Haun
b. January 18 1815
m. October 27 1848
d. June 6 1860
James’ next brother in age, Henry Peter Haun, was an attorney and gentleman farmer. He married his cousin Catherine Haun in 1848 and traveled to California overland as part of the original ’49 rush. By 1853, the couple was settled on a ranch outside Marysville, where they grew fruit, and H.P. had a thriving local law practice. They had two children together, Kate (1851) and David Rose (1853).

On one notable occasion in June 1856, H.P. traveled to Plumas County to visit his connections there and explore the diggins, taking an ox-drawn wagon across the feather river and up a difficult mule track.

H.P. was later elected as a judge and in 1859 was appointed by Governor Bigler to serve out Senator Broderick’s term, after his death in a duel. He served as senator from November 1859 – February 1860, and passed away just three days after his return home from a session of congress.

top

Catherine ‘Cath’ Margaret Haun
A cousin of the Haun brothers, Cath married H.P. in 1848. Though she suffered from poor health she traveled with him to California and to Washington, D.C. during his term in congress.

top

Andrew Jackson ‘Jack’ Haun
b. November 1828
m. 1855
d. January 4 1864
Jack Haun was one of James’ young siblings. He appears only sporadically in the diaries, living and working at H.P.’s ranch in Marysville. He settled there permanently and married Ellen Buchanan, a widow, with whom he had two daughters, and raised two step children.

top

David ‘Dave’ Lloyd Haun
b. 1830
d. March 20 1912
A younger brother of James Haun, Dave accompanied father and son to California in 1853. He worked with them in the mines for a period before returning to H.P. Haun’s ranch in Marysville to pursue his legal career. In January 1854 he abruptly departed from Marysville without explanation, resurfacing in Kentucky in March. He continued to study law in Kentucky until 1855, when he escorted Martha Haun and Lizzie Hurst to California to join James and John.

He continued his law practice back in California where he also held political office, serving as in the California legislature in 1860 and as Plumas County District Attorney from 1870 – 1873. Ultimately, Dave married Annie Pratt, whose family founded Prattsville on Lake Almanor. The couple settled in Greenville, where Dave built and operated a saw mill.

042_photo-e1396917730729_sm
David Lloyd Haun

top

William ‘W.G.’ Haun
A brother of James’ living in Indiana.

top

Elizabeth ‘Lizzie’ Hurst Moore
m. June 3 1841
d. 1853
A sister of Martha Haun, Lizzie married and settled near Lexington.

top

Jane Hurst
A sister of Martha Haun.

top

Mary Elizabeth ‘Lizzie’ Hurst Haun Ward Moore
b. 1842 at Plymira, MO
m. September 9, 1857 at the New England Ranch; 1880 at Lexington, KY
d. 1915 at Lexington, KY
The child of John Baeler Hurst and Hester Bryan Hurst, Lizzie came to live with her aunt Martha Haun in Georgetown, KY. The two joined James and John in California in 1855, traveling via the Isthmus of Panama, to settle in the American Valley. Liz eloped with Trobridge Ward in 1857 at the age of 15. The marriage was not a happy one. After its dissolution, Lizzie returned to Kentucky with her five children. She later remarried Thornton Moore of Lexington.

top

Trobridge ‘Tro’ Ward
b. 1827
m. September 9, 1857
d. November 21 1912 at Marysville, CA
Tro Ward was born in Vergennes, Vermont, the son of Judge William T. Ward and Harriet Sherrill. He later lived in Dartford, Wisconsin, but came to California in 1849 during the original Gold Rush. The rest of his family later joined him there. Ward had a disreputable image in the community. In 1856 he was tried for illegal gambling in Quincy. He took up with fifteen-year-old Lizzie in the winter of 1857, and though her family tried to keep them apart, the two eloped together later that year and settled in Indian Valley. The two had five children before eventually separating.

top

In California

Plumas County Residents (Identified)

J.M. Blood
b. October 9 1830
m. January 1 1852
d. December 8 1879
Blood and his wife traveled overland from Peoria, Illinois to Marysville in 1852 shortly after their marriage. In 1856 he settled in Elizabethtown and opened a trading business in partnership with his brother and E.D. Hasselkus. One ad appearing in the Plumas Argus July 16 1857 reported, “Blood, Brother & Co. have just received a large lot of Iron nd Steel, which willbe sold low for cash.” He subsequently moved on to cattle dealing and later purchased the Conant Ranch in Indian Valley (Fariss and Smith, pg 301).

top

Thomas D. Bonner
Bonner was a registered Justice of the Peace for the Quartz Township (Johnsville and the surrounding area) from October 7 1853 (Fariss and Smith pg 172). He worked as circuit court judge, famous for enforcing payment of fees. His preaching is referred to several times in the Hauns’ account.

top

Daniel Rogers Cate
b. November 24 1832
m. November 5 1863
Cate traveled to California from Boston by sea in 1849. He did not immediately go to work mining, but instead got a job bringing supplies from Stockton to French camp at the salary of an ounce per day. He spent time in Central America, and did a stint mining near Downieville before settling in American valley and building a saw mill with his business partner, Judkins. The business grew to include a blacksmith operation, a store, a flour mill, and another saw mill, as well as the farm. Cate was elected as the county’s first treasurer in 1854.

top

Dr. La Fayette Cate
b. December 25 1820
m. 1865, to Martha A. Smith
d. August 22. 1916
Dr. Cate was graduate of the Vermont Medical College  in 1852 (Fariss and Smith, pg. 284). In 1854, he escorted his youngest sister, Lydia Cate, from the family home in Northfield, New Hampshire to the home of their brother D.R. Cate at Cate Ranch in American Valley in 1854 (Plumas County Museum files). Dr. Cate himself settled in Elizabeth town, where he set up practice, traveling about the county on horseback to visit his patients.

Dr. Cate served as County Treasurer from 1878 to 1880 (Fariss and Smith, pg 284). In 1886 he was famously involved in the shooting death of notable miner Dan Folsom, who approached Dr. Cate and his son Daniel Cate as they were leaving the county Court House in Quincy and began shooting. Daniel Cate wounded Folsom in the neck during the ensuing gun fight and he died within about 20 minutes.

In 1891 Dr. Cate moved to Adin in Modoc County, where he remained until his death.

top

Coffin
A Nelson Point pharmacist with partner Rice. According to an advertisement in the September 9 1859 issue of the Plumas Argus, they dealt in such goods as perfume, paint, oils, Arrow Root, for delicate digestive systems, Cherry Pectoral for throat and lung diseases, Blue Mass, a mercury-based medication believed to cure nearly anything, and other medicines of the period.

top

Thomas Cox
A Quincy lawyer, Cox was elected as Plumas County’s first District Attorney in 1854 following its founding, but was never re-elected. A native of North Carolina, he had settled in Tennessee but was purportedly forced to flee to California  in the wake of an unknown indiscretion. One drunken night in 1862 he famously shot an unoffending bartender in the forehead. Miraculously, the man was only slightly hurt and quickly recovered. Charges were dismissed, and Cox relocated again, this time to Nevada, where he resumed his practice in Virginia City (Fariss and Smith, pg. 180). He figures slightly in the Hauns’ account, including in July 1854, September 1854, August 1856, February 1857.

top

Frank S. Fox
Fox operated a mercantile in Nelson Point advertised in the February 3 1859 Plumas Argus as “dealer in all kind of merchandize, low for cash, highest prices paid for gold dust.”

top

Patrick Oglesby Hundley
b. April 13 1822
m. 1855
An attorney and graduate of the University of Louisville, Hundley left Kentucky for California in ’49. He mined in Amador county, Nevada county, and what would later become Plumas county before establishing a law practice in Gibsonville in 1853, relocating to Quincy in 1854. He enjoyed a varied political career, serving as a county supervisor, state assemblyman, and district attorney in Plumas county, and as a judge in Butte county. He appears in the Hauns’ account in his professional capacity, advising on court cases, drawing up mortgages, and etc., including on October 23 1855, February 11 1856, May 19 1856, May 3 1859, as well as on other occasions.

top

James H. Larison
b. February 23 1828
m. July 17 1849
A native of Ohio, Larison traveled to California overland in 1850 and began mining in Placer County until 1852, when he returned home to collect his family. Returning to California in 1853, he settled in Plumas county where he continued mining until 1869, eventually settling on a ranch there (Fariss and Smith, pg 284). Larison appears just once in the Hauns’ account, in September 1856.

top

John Lloyd
b. December 11 1804
A native of Georgetown, John Lloyd arrives in mining camp unexpectedly June 14 1854 and becomes one of James Haun’s mining partners.

top

John Sylvester Root
b. August 23 1820, Carthage New York
m. Lydia Cate (sister to Dr. Cate) October 29 1862
d. October 15 1872
A native of Carthage, New York, John Root traveled to California during the gold rush, arriving in Calaveras in 1850 and in Plumas County in 1852. He operated the Root & Co. grocery and mercantile at Nelson Creek in 1854, where he also served as postmaster for several years. (Plumas County Museum files)

top

James ‘Jim’ L.C. Sherwin
A Nelson Creek miner and businessman, Sherwin was responsible for the building of a large flume to carry water for use in the mines. He won a state assembly seat in 1857, an experience he evidently did not enjoy, declaring at the end of his term that “he could beat any man living , on foot, to ‘Nelson P’int'” (Fariss and Smith, pg 197).

top

Lewis Stark
b. 1808
‘Squire Stark’ was a prominent local figure. He traveled overland from Tennessee to California 1852, becoming one of the first to follow James Beckworth into American Valley, where he became one of the founding settlers of Elizabethtown. The community was named after his daughter (Fariss and Smith, pg 286). He was a justice of the peace for Butte and Plumas counties, and frequently appears in the Hauns’ account, on one occasion stepping in to prevent the miners from bowling during a sermon.

top

Jon ‘Snowshoe’ Thompson
b. April 30 1827, Norway
m.
d.
Born Jon Tostensen, Thompson settled with his family in the midwest as a boy, but joined the Gold Rush in 1851. After working in the mines of the Sierra foothills, he settled near Placerville. In 1855, he answered an ad for a postal carrier to carry mail overland some 90 miles from Placerville to Carson City along the Old Emigrant Road and later the Big Tree Rout between Genoa and Murphy’s Camp. Thompson became famous as a skiing postman (skis were at the time known as “snowshoes”) traveling at unprecedented skill and speed through the mountains for almost 20 years.

top

Dr. John Scott Vaughan
b. September 3 1818
m. 1846
d. November 4 1870
Dr. Vaughan came to California from Missouri in the rush of ’49. He mined and practiced medicine in Nelson Creek, Rabbit Creek, Elizabethtown, and lastly Quincy, where he remained until his death in 1870. His family returned to Missouri after his death.

Judge William T. Ward
b. February 28 1802 at Cummington, MA
m. 1825
d. April 21 1878 at Quincy, CA
Arrived in California in 1853 and settled in Indian Valley until his appointment as judge brought him to the county seat at Quincy until the end of his term in 1857. In 1861 he purchased Genesee mine (Faris and Smith, pg 178.)

top

Plumas County Residents (Unidentified)

If you have a possible identification for any of the individuals listed here, please write to us hauncollection@gmail.com.

Abbott
Charley Allen
Yank Bath
Ed Bass
Beel
Dave Berryhill
Boyanthen
Alford Bray
James H. Bray
H. Bray
Brewster’s
Brown
Buck
Butts
Carroll
Chance
Chunkey
Mrs Cleveland
Coburn
Lem Compton
Tim Compton
Cook
Cooper
Cornelison
Criss
Cross
Pat Curley
Mrs Dean
Davies
Pat Dobson
Duesler
Durrich
Mard Edwards
Tom Eves
Ike Farris
Joe Ficklin
Foots
Gillingham
Givens
Frank Goble
Goodshall
Ben Goreman
Joe Grenny
Gilky Griffin
Mrs Haden
Harvey
Hawkins
Hayden
Nate Hayes
Weston Haver
Mark Haviland
Judge Heath
Tom Hickman
Hitrich
Meredith Hogan
Hopkins
Howlin
Hueston
John Humphrey
Inman
Jacobsen
Tom Jennings
Mrs Jennings
Ed Keene
George Kline
Kyler
Mrs Lacy
Lawrance
John Lewis
Mrs Lindly
John K. Lovejoy – Co-publisher of the Old Mountaineer
Ben Luman
Lynch
McMan
Maguire
Green McHatton
McDonald
McFall
Barney McLane
Ebe Moorehead
Parish
Payne
Picket
Jim Pike
Phelps
Phillips
Big Pike
George Poor
Jack Power
Predeaux
William ‘Bill’ Rains
Mrs Reel
Reynolds
Riddle
Shaw
Shively
Mill Shores
Dave Shults
James ‘Jim’ Shults
Slokeham
John Smale
Sockham (also check Lockham)
Stirling
Body Sterling
Sweeten
Taplin
Tell
Timberman
Varner
May Wheeler
Mat Wheeler
Dave Willman
Miss Williams
Whitney
Yank

top

Marysville Residents

Buchannan
Mrs Buchannan
Taylor

top

In Kentucky

George Algiar
Ed Applegate
Tom Barclay
Barlow
John Beatty
Dr. Church Blackburn
Sally Blackburn
Ben Bradley
Dr Bradley
Steve Burbridge
Dora Burns – Mollie’s sister, a school teacher.
Evan Cannin
Jimmie Cantrill
Ellick Carrick
Mary Chambers
Lou Chambers
Clark
Frank Colcord
John H Collins
General Counroy
Tom Crockett
Will Crockett
Betsy Crumbaugh
Jimmie Crumbaugh
John Crumbaugh
Joanna Cullen
Sallie Dougherty
Ruth Downey
Alvin Duvall – A Georgetown attorney
Joe Elgin
Ellen Finnell
Ethan Finnell
Thomas Finnell
Johnnie Fitzsimmons
Tom Flanagan
Bet Foster
Galliham
Ganoe
Lizzie Garth
Harvey Graves
Howard Graves
Norah Graves
Jane Graves
Martha Graves
Wallace Graves – A native of Georgetown, killed in action
Jones Griffin
Dr. Handle – A boarder at Martha Haun’s in Georgetown
Mr Hand – Lizzie Hurst’s schoole teacher
Bled Harmon
Sinia Harris
Hat
Hickman
HIldreth
Bets Holtzclaw
Eli Holtzclaw
Tom Holtzclaw
Mary F. Houston
Steve Houston
Hull
James Hurst – Martha’s brother, died  1854
John Hurst – Martha’s brother
Sallie Hutchins – A cousin of Mollie’s
H. Hynes – A military student expelled from his school, he engaged in a shooting in the street over Ellen Finnell in 1854.
Billy Johnson
Johnny Johnson
General Johnson
Tom Johnson
Bob Keene
Squire Kemp
Thomas Kimill
Kitt – A slave serving Martha Haun
Betty Jenkins Lemon
Frank Lemon
Joe Lemon
John Lemon
David Lloyd
Helen Loffton
Darinda Maddox
Tom Martin
Jessie McConnell
Sallie McConnell Waits
Dr. McClarth
Dr. Meets
Laura Miller
Mrs Mitchell
Thornton Moore
Bet Mooreland
Newbold
Clem Nutter
Eph Offutt
Hazel Offutt
Lewis Offutt
Charlie Osbourne
Lizzie Othwell
Tom Othwell
Billie Page
Jeff Polk
Nat Polk
Powell
Pratt
Henry Prewett
Tom Pullen
Bob Rankin
Frank Rankin
Raulins
Reed
Rinnell
Robinson – A Georgetown attorney
Jimmie Robinson – His son
Gabbie Ross
Mary Roy
Will Roy
David ‘Dave’ Runion
Sam – A slave serving Martha Haun
Sant
Nat Saunders
Mrs Saunders
Jeffry ‘Jeff’ Shepard
D.H. Smith – A friend and correspondent of James Haun
Emma Smith
Noah Spears
Steadman
Irvin Stevenson
Stuart
Dave Sullivan
Hugh Sullivan
Mat Saunders
Stark Taylor
Bat Thompson
Sam Thompson
Captain Tiffany
George Topass
Allie Toyman
David ‘Davy’ Threkeld
Green Tucker
Wash – A slave serving Martha Haun
Maggie Webb – A maternal cousin of John’s
Will Webb
Clint West
John West
Louis West
Orval West
Tom White
Jack Winter
Jenny Winter
Lloyd Winter
Will Wood

top

In Ohio

Nannie McClelland